Trapshooting team shares their experiences

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IT’S A TRAP! A shell flies out as senior Isaac Stephens shoots his 12 gauge shot gun at a trap shooting competition at Ark Valley Shooting Range Oct. 22. Stephens attempted to break the school record of hitting 50 targets. He had hit 49 consecutively earlier this season. photo by JD Biehler

Steady breathing, eyes focused, anticipation for the target, and finally: the shot. This is the art of trapshooting.

“Trap shooting is a clay target game in which a squad or five shooters shoot from five different stations at a total of 25 targets for the round,” history teacher and trap shooting coach at Kapaun Mt. Carmel David Roberts said. “We shoot two rounds for a score of 50 every week. We stand in front of the 16 yard line. There is an oscillating clay target thrower in the trap house. When a person says ‘pull’ or calls for the target, the target will launch within a certain area and then you shoot that target.”

Roberts believes that there is no right way to trapshoot, but rather many different styles.

“The thing that I would always say is, ‘Keep your cheek on the stalk and your eye on the rock,’ and be in a comfortable athletic stance,” Roberts said. Some guys will do certain things for their breathing technique, some guys will really try to open up their eyes particularly wide before they call for the target, some guys will shoot with one eye partially open.”