KMC Crusade

Leaders must confront issues

photo+courtesy+of+Emily+Schoeppner
photo courtesy of Emily Schoeppner

photo courtesy of Emily Schoeppner

photo courtesy of Emily Schoeppner

Hannah Harpel, editor-in-chief

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photo courtesy of Emily Schoeppner

A staff editorial is the opinion of the Kapaun Mt. Carmel Paladin newsmagazine staff. The intent is to state an opinion related to a news story and make suggestions for change or compliment something.
In late July, Pennsylvania state attorney General Josh Shapiro has exposed at least 300 Catholic priests as child sex abusers with more than 1,000 victims throughout the state of Pennsylvania.
Over a period of 70 years, bishops and other Church leaders have covered up these abuses by “persuading victims to not report the abuse, and law enforcement not to investigate it” and moving the accused priest around to different parishes or cities after an incident of sexual abuse occurred, according to the Grand Jury report.
Pope Francis is among the Church leaders who are being accused for covering up sexual abuse cases. According to former Papal Nuncio Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, Pope Francis knew about decades’ worth of sexual abuse by Theodore McCarrick, the former archbishop of Washington, D.C.; however, Pope Francis failed to take any effective action against McCarrick.
If Viganò’s allegations are true, then Pope Francis is not fit to properly lead the Church and should be forced to resign. Pope Francis has not made an official comment over the subject, which makes the general population assume the worst, and is ultimately hurting the Catholic Church.
In response to the scandal, the Church has taken drastic measures in an attempt to prevent future sexual abuse. These measures include: Safe Environment training in 194 dioceses, equipping 5 million children with skills to protect themselves from abuse, background checks on Church personnel who interact with kids, as well as psychological testing for those wishing to enter the seminary.
Although the Pope himself has not made an official comment, leaders in the Church, nationally and locally, have been very vocal, condemning all priests and bishops involved in this scandal. KMC Chaplain Fr. Curtis Hecker is an example of a priest who is dealing with the scandal directly by discussing it in a straightforward manner and apologizing on behalf of those priests.
Directly addressing and condemning the sexual abuse scandal is vital for the Church because it shows the public that the Church acknowledges its mistakes and is adamant in preventing any future cases. As long as sexual abuse exists in the Catholic Church, Church leaders should be held responsible to criminally charge the abuser and to instate more rules to further prevent future cases.

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Leaders must confront issues