KMC Crusade

Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes

Infographic+by+Kaegan+Cowan
Infographic by Kaegan Cowan

Infographic by Kaegan Cowan

Infographic by Kaegan Cowan

Kaegan Cowan, Sports Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Before the college basketball season even began, it was rocked by an unprecedented scandal involving players, coaches, and athletic apparel companies. The outcome of the federal investigation into college basketball could have long-term implications.

There are two separate sets of charges that have been brought forth by the FBI, according to ESPN. The first set alleges that Adidas executives, in particular James Gatto, director of global sports marketing for Adidas, made hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of payments to players who committed to college basketball programs associated with Adidas.

The second set of charges alleges that assistant coaches at Arizona, Auburn, Oklahoma State and the University of Southern California took bribes to push top recruits towards certain agents and financial advisors for the recruits. The agents and advisors would make more money off these players when they became National Basketball Association (NBA) players.

The most high-profile school to be associated with the scandal at this point appears to be the University of Louisville, who promptly fired their men’s basketball head coach Rick Pitino upon finding out about the allegations. The decision is interesting for Louisville because Pitino had already been involved in another scandal recently but kept his job. He is appealing his termination on the grounds that he is being scapegoated for the sins of the program.

But, again, that’s not the end of this story. The deeper implications for college basketball are that the scandal could force the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) to change its rules about players earning money off their likeness. Currently, the NCAA does not allow players to make money off their likenesses; this is why officially marketed NCAA jerseys do not include players’ last names on the back, and it’s also why the beloved NCAA Football game series was discontinued indefinitely. But, due to the prevalence of athletes gaining money off their likenesses in various (and technically illegal) ways, the NCAA may have to change its rules.

This scandal is almost certainly not limited to assistant coaches and Adidas. Nike will come under heavy scrutiny in a matter of time. And there are many more Adidas schools, notably the University of Kansas, for which the FBI investigation has not yet concluded.

And, though the illegal activities are probably far-reaching in college basketball, college football hasn’t even been discussed yet. And, because college basketball and football are the most popular collegiate sports in the United States, there is more money involved with them than with any other sports. Wherever the most money is likely is where the most cheating will be.

Despite all the speculation about the future of the investigation, one thing is for sure: This scandal is not over.

Infographic by Kaegan Cowan

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes

    Sports

    Explore track practice; meet athletes

  • Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes

    News & Features

    Mental edge key to golf success

  • Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes

    News & Features

    Divers Set Records

  • Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes

    Sports

    Experience Diving with the New Dive Team

  • Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes

    Sports

    Kansas basketball teams qualify for NCAA Tournament

  • Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes

    News & Features

    Free, fun survival game attracts well-deserved excitement

  • Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes

    Sports

    Olympics Bring Korean Unification

  • Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes

    News & Features

    Senior places second in state competition

  • Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes

    News & Features

    9 powerlifters place at state contest

  • Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes

    Photos

    Jared’s Shots – Jan 29

The Student News Site of Kapaun Mt. Carmel
Crimes taint upcoming season; raise questions about athletes